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DITA Blog - 7 hours 42 min ago

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Categories: DITA

The Counterpoint of Content Flow

The Content Wrangler - Thu, 2015-05-21 15:00

By Karl Montevirgen, special to The Content Wrangler

Karl Montevirgen

Karl Montevirgen

As content creators and consumers, we’re all aware of the multiple dynamics at play when it comes to viewing and creating content. Content has a kind of flow.  It directs movement within and between pieces of content, exhibiting diverse rhythms, densities, and forms. Content flow, as we perceive it, plays a significant role in shaping the reader/viewer’s experience. Ultimately, the impact of this experience can be critical, as it often marks the difference between success and failure in a given content enterprise.

Let’s take a closer look at content flow, specifically what it is, how it functions, and how it can be shaped.

Editor’s note: See The Language of Content Strategy for an alternative definition and usage of the term content flow.

What is Content Flow?

Content flow refers to the structural and conceptual movements implied within a single or combined piece of content.

It can be broken down like this:

  1. Content implies structural movement (start here, end there).
  2. Content also implies movement in concepts/ideas (start with this line of thought, end with that line of thought or action).
  3. Content flow is made up of distinct movements occurring within a single piece of content and between different sets of content.

Good content flow facilitates a reader’s movement through sections of content and the ideas expressed within them. It makes content more engaging, lighter to read and digest, and easier to retain. Bad content flow has the opposite effect.

Here’s a familiar scenario: you come across a website that appears well-structured. The content seems well-written, graphics are attractive, and the information provided is complete. But, something about it doesn’t jell. The  content seems to clash or interfere with itself, and the navigation doesn’t seem very fluid. In the end, you can’t seem to understand or remember what the site was all about.

What’s happening here? How is it that a well-structured presentation composed of well-written content isn’t working? One likely culprit is the relationship between content types and content segments, namely text content-to-graphic content, content-to-content, and the sequence of movements in between. Although content structure (i.e. style guide) plays a static role in organizing and ‘containing’ content, it nevertheless envelops dynamic elements that exceed it.

Dynamic content includes:

  • A single piece of content alone, when engaged,
  • The relationship between content to content, and
  • Individual viewers/readers with their powers of attention, interpretation, and retention.

Ultimately, what you have are different energies of movement and counter-movement. Although a viewer’s choice of what to read, in what sequence, and its interpretation is beyond the control of the content creator, the arrangement of content with its implied movements can still make a big difference in setting the stage of engagement.

Content contra Content: Counterpoint

Perhaps approaching content flow from a different angle and discipline might add some insight into how it works. Let’s take the concept of “flow” from a musical perspective. There is a particular practice in Western music (one that was very prominent during the late 17th and early 18th century) called counterpoint. This term refers to a technique in which two or more independent melodies are combined (point against point, melody against melody). Melodies in counterpoint have their own sense of direction, rhythm, and flow. Yet when combined, the melodies work together harmoniously. If you can imagine creating a melody and then setting another one against it, you will be able appreciate how difficult it is to do this successfully.

Dj mixing in night club

The combination of multiple forms of content isn’t that much different. Each piece of content has its own unique set of attributes. It has different spatial limits (a starting point and an ending point). It has varying degrees of density which imply different experiences of time and effort. It contains its own specific message or line of thought. Each content piece has its own stylistic genre and form of utterance — the sales pitch, description, call to action, disclaimer, etc. — all of which can be phrased in different ways. It has its own sense of rhythm—in utterance and ideas—and tempo, both of which can move faster or slower depending on what is being conveyed, and how it is being conveyed.

If each piece of content has its own unique attributes and sense of flow, what happens when you combine content? Is it easy to get stuck on one section at the expense of the other sections? Do the content sections differ so much that readers feel they have to retain or juggle concepts in order to comprehend the whole? Does the content flow seem to ping-pong or deflect from one section to another? To be fair, user experience is somewhat subjective and will differ.  Even so, there are a few basic principles we can keep in mind when creating and assessing the flow of content.

Content Flow Comparisons

Let’s look at a comparative example between Ninja Trader versus MultiCharts. Both companies develop trading software which customers can buy and sell financial derivatives (futures contracts) in various markets. Though now a brokerage, Ninja Trader has been one of the most popular and widely used trading platforms for several years. MultiCharts, on the other hand, is a runner-up that is quickly gaining ground in the trading software industry.

Example 1: Ninja Trader:

KM-NinjaTrader_example

Notice the two implied lines of motion converging at the middle point. The suggested motion combined with simplicity of style makes for ease of movement and minimal effort on the part of the viewer. Company description, differentiation features (cost and award winning technology), and calls to action are easily identifiable.

The use of minimal text increases emphasis on the message. The words were carefully selected to include a statement of quality and/or tenet (“Trading Simplified”), an identifier of function (“Brokerage”), a statement of low cost (“$0.53 per contract”), a statement of status or accolades (“Award Winning Platform”), and a call to action (“Use It Free”).  The second line on the right announces a link to view low pricing (“View Commissions”), a reinforcing statement of low cost (“Low Cost Brokerage”), and another call to action (“Open Account”). Note that both lines are color coded to suggest motion and also to establish better flow between text and graphics.

The term “brokerage” marks the convergence point supported by large font and uppercase letters. Though the statement of the price of $0.53 per contract has a much smaller font, the color coding attaches it to the line of sight guaranteeing its exposure. The rhythm and tempo of the content narrative is sparse and quick as the conclusion (call to action) is arrived at with minimal (informational) hold-up.

Culturally, there is also something at play. There is an image of a Caucasian man smiling, which implies an image of the ideal “satisfied” customer, an image symbolizing the people who work for the company, a “smirk” symbolizing success, or an “edge” that leads to success. This image is given prominence in both placement and size. The image supporting the term “low cost”  is that of a woman who appears to be a minority. Her image is much smaller. This has cultural implications that must be brought to one’s attention since it directly or indirectly makes a cultural statement whether intended or not.

Example 2:  MultiCharts:

KM-MultiCharts-Example

MultiCharts is an excellent trading platform with numerous functionalities that meet a wide range of retail traders’ needs. Encapsulating this message within a limited space, however, can be very tricky. There are trade-offs to be made in terms of what is and what is not stated. Let’s take a closer look at their home page.

Imagine, for a moment, what this site might look like without the colored boxes. What catches your eye? Is it the multi-colored circular image on the right which connects with the logo on the left and the name of the company below the logo? Where do you begin? There seems to be an implied line of movement here, but what information is latched on to it?

Let’s start with the image in the black box on the right. It gives you percentages separated by colors, but what do the percentages signify? Is the meaning or purpose clear? You see a call to action (to try or buy) that comes at you immediately given the prominence of the image, but it either comes too soon, or it’s a placeholder for action once you’ve read the rest of the site.

Another prominent section is the bulleted section below the company name as seen in the purple box. As an industry insider, I’d assume that the featured technical functionalities differentiate the platform from its competitors. But even for an industry insider, the information provided is partial and unclear. After a few bullets, you can see that there are 70+ more features. Aside from having multiple features, what else might this tell the reader? Perhaps we can find out, but we will have to exit the page. There is still much more content to read in order to piece together the overall message.

There are two sets of navigational tabs, found in the top and middle of the page. How does that direct the “sequence” of your actions? Perhaps you may find yourself tempted to click one of the tab links for more specific information, but does that mean you will miss out on something important on the home page?

In the yellow box in the middle, you find information about the company. It’s an award-winning platform, as it states in the first sentence. The statement of accolades seems well-hidden. Perhaps this was intended, or perhaps it was an oversight.

Let’s stop here. What I am trying to point out is that the content flow in this example suggests a puzzle to be solved. It offers clues to explore, remember, return to, and finally piece together. In addition to this, the density of content establishes a rhythm and tempo that is slow, laborious, and disjointed. It takes time to solve and assemble puzzles.

Five Concepts to Help You Shape Content Flow

So what can we do to shape content flow? The answer is that there are multiple ways to approach this, and it varies depending on the circumstances and content goals. It may be a strategic concern, but its realization takes place in the tactical sphere. However, there are a few general concepts to keep in mind that might be helpful:

  1. Content implies a territory.
    Content has both a spatial location and a centralized set of ideas–a “territory.” That territory has its own form and mode of articulation through which it expresses a message. Depending on the emphasis of the value placed on that message, its size, appearance, and placement matters considerably. What kind of emphasis do you want to place on a given message? How should you express it? In what form, and why?
  2. Content has its own sense of gravity.
    Figuratively speaking, as a “territory”, content has a gravity that “pulls” the viewer toward the ideas expressed, and the space containing those ideas. Some content sections will have a greater sense of pull, depending on the interest of the viewer, the compelling nature of the message, and its placement alongside other content sections that can either distract from or reinforce it. Where do you place a given piece of content and why? What will that placement do to the overall presentation or flow?
  3. Content demands its own unique time for engagement. 
    Should content be densely or lightly concentrated? How should you balance the density of “text” against the density of ideas? After all, you can create heavy text with light ideas, or light text with heavy ideas. Think of it this way–you have a scarcity of space and your viewer probably has a scarcity of time. Content demands time. How can you make the best use of limited space and time to seamlessly and effectively deliver your message?
  4. Think movement and counter-movement. 
    If you understand these first three points, then you get a sense that there are potentially multiple and diverse flows happening simultaneously. A viewer may not read everything simultaneously (although it is possible if the content is sparse enough), but think of the overall effect of the content which can be experienced as a cumulative impression or understanding of the material, and the actual sequence of engagement. The flow of movement and clarity of the message is deeply affected by the placement of content sections and the independent movements they imply, as shown in our examples above. Again, it operates like a counterpoint, and getting each piece to fit harmoniously depends on how the content is composed and arranged.
  5. Think of content flow in terms of a multi-dimensional narrative.
    Ultimately, you are telling a story which you are hoping materializes in a change of thought or action on the part of the viewer. Your story may have just one or a few parts, but its material features are numerous and heterogeneous. They can operate dimensionally, divergently, and in a non-linear fashion. Your core message tells a story and has a sequence, but so does your graphic arrangement, content sections, links, pages, etc. It all affects the sequence of actions and continuity of the overall message.

Content flow is a tricky thing to manage. Flow is much less perceptible than the content that generates it. Managing content flow requires the ability to think around or between content, to think of content not only as a “thing”, but as a set of intensities that compose it. Like architecture, where a building is defined as much by the people who use it as by its physical attributes, content is defined by the way in which viewers engage, experience, and are affected by it.

Content flow determines the success or failure of content’s ability to engage and affect.

Categories: DITA

Treat Docs like Code: Doc Bugs and Issues

JustWriteClick - Tue, 2015-05-19 13:33

This is a follow on to a post on opensource.com about using git and GitHub for technical documentation. In the OpenSource.com article, I discuss reviews and keeping up with contributions. This post talks about fixes and patches.

htakashi_typewriter

What about doc issues in GitHub, how do you get through all those?

In OpenStack, we document how to triage doc bugs, and that’s what you need to do in GitHub, is establish your process for incoming issues. Use Labels in GitHub to indicate the status and priority. Basically, you have to accept that it’s a doc bug, if it’s not a doc bug, ask for more information from the reporter. If you want to create labels for particular deliverables, like the API doc or end-user doc, you can further organize your doc issues. You will need to define priorities as well — what’s critical and must be fixed? What’s more “wishlist” and you’ll get to it when you can? If you use similar systems for both issues and pull requests you’ll have your work prioritized for you when you look at the GitHub backlog.

How can you encourage contributors to create a good pull request for docs?

The best answer for this is “documentation” but also great onboarding. Make sure someone’s first pull request is handled well with a personal touch. There’s a lot of coaching going on when you do reviews. Ensure that you’ve written up “What goes where” as this is often the hardest part of doc maintenance for a large body of work that already exists. This expansion problem is only getting harder in OpenStack as more projects are added. We’re having a lot of documentation sessions at the OpenStack Summit this week and we’d love to talk more about creating good doc patches.

One person I work with uses GitHub emojis every chance he gets when he reviews pull requests. I think that’s fun and sets a nice tone for reviews.

Nitpicking can be averted if you point to your style guide and conventions with a good orientation to a newcomer so that new contributors don’t get turned off by feeling nitpicked.

Have you heard of anyone who has combined GitHub with a different UI “top layer” to simplify the UI?

O’Reilly has done this with their Atlas platform. For reviews, the Gerrit UI has been extremely useful to a large collection of projects like OpenStack. There’s Penflip, which is a better frontend for writers than GitHub. The background story is great in that it offers anecdotes about GitHub being super successful for collaborative writing projects.

I think that GitHub itself is fine if your docs are treated like code. I think GitHub is great for technical writing, API documentation, and the like. Academic writers haven’t found GitHub that much of a match for their collaborative writing, see “The Limitations of GitHub for Writers” for example. It’s the actual terms that have to be adapted and adopted for GitHub to be a match for writers. For example, do you track doc bugs (issues) and write collaboratively with added content treated like software features? I say, yes!

If you just want simple markup like markdown for collaborative writing, check out Beegit. With git in the name I have to wonder if it’s git-backed, but couldn’t figure it out from a few minutes on their site. Looks promising but again, for treating docs like code, living and working with developers.

Categories: DITA

Gilbane Advisor 5.12.15 – The Omni Channel Paradox

The Omni Channel Paradox We all say it in slightly different ways: A superior customer experience requires consistent, seamless, experience across all channels. Depending on our job, we tend to focus on different integration challenges. Easy to say, but Mayur Gupta points out just how multi-faceted and formidable this fragmentation is. Brands have as much […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

Gilbane Advisor 5.12.15 – The Omni Channel Paradox

The Omni Channel Paradox We all say it in slightly different ways: A superior customer experience requires consistent, seamless, experience across all channels. Depending on our job, we tend to focus on different integration challenges. Easy to say, but Mayur Gupta points out just how multi-faceted and formidable this fragmentation is. Brands have as much […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

SPARQL: the video

bobdc.blog - Sun, 2015-05-03 20:15
Well, a video, but a lot of important SPARQL basics in a short period of time. Bob DuCharme http://www.snee.com/bobdc.blog
Categories: DITA

Hello world!

The Content Wrangler - Mon, 2015-04-20 00:57

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Categories: DITA

Hello world!

The Content Wrangler - Sat, 2015-04-18 19:39

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Categories: DITA

Gilbane Advisor 4.16.15 – The Apple Watch’s Raison D’être

Gilbane Conference 2015 call for papers deadline is May 1 Learn more The Apple Watch’s Raison D’être John Kirk is mostly right, but there is more to say. Though it’s fun to speculate on Apple’s initial intent, it is more useful to consider how the Apple watch actually fits into the the evolution of computing, and […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

Gilbane Advisor 4.16.15 – The Apple Watch’s Raison D’être

Gilbane Conference 2015 call for papers deadline is May 1 Learn more The Apple Watch’s Raison D’être John Kirk is mostly right, but there is more to say. Though it’s fun to speculate on Apple’s initial intent, it is more useful to consider how the Apple watch actually fits into the the evolution of computing, and […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

Running Spark GraphX algorithms on Library of Congress subject heading SKOS

bobdc.blog - Sun, 2015-04-12 13:55
Well, one algorithm, but a very cool one. Bob DuCharme http://www.snee.com/bobdc.blog
Categories: DITA

Gilbane Advisor 3.31.15 – Is a Mobile Deep Linking Standard Necessary?

Gilbane Conference 2015 call for papers Share and network with your peers as a speaker at our next conference. Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston. December 1-3.  Learn more How to Launch Your Digital Platform …I draw from this research to offer a framework to help aspiring entrepreneurs make the right strategic decisions as they build their own platforms… […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

Gilbane Advisor 3.31.15 – Is a Mobile Deep Linking Standard Necessary?

Gilbane Conference 2015 call for papers Share and network with your peers as a speaker at our next conference. Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston. December 1-3.  Learn more How to Launch Your Digital Platform …I draw from this research to offer a framework to help aspiring entrepreneurs make the right strategic decisions as they build their own platforms… […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

Spark and SPARQL; RDF Graphs and GraphX

bobdc.blog - Sun, 2015-03-29 16:24
Some interesting possibilities for working together. Bob DuCharme http://www.snee.com/bobdc.blog
Categories: DITA

Male allies for women in tech: What’s needed?

JustWriteClick - Mon, 2015-03-23 11:58

I realized the other day that I have given my “Women in Tech: Be That Light” presentation a half a dozen times in the last year. One question that I still want a great answer for is when a man in the audience asks, “What can I do to make it better? How can I be that light?” I have ideas from my own experiences, and also point to the training courses and Ally Skills workshops offered by the Ada Initiative. Updated to add: Register now for the Monday 5/18 workshop at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver!

flickr-ngmmemuda-ally

On a personal level, here’s my short list based on my own experiences. My experiences are colored by my own privileges being white, straight, married with an amazing partner, a parent, living in a great country in a safe neighborhood, working in a secure job. So realize that even while I write my own experiences at a specific place in my career, all those stations in life color my own views, and may not directly help people with backgrounds dissimilar to mine.

What do women in tech need? How can I help?

  • Be that friendly colleague at meetups, especially to the few women in the room, while balancing the fact that she probably doesn’t want to be called out as uniquely female or an object to be admired. If you already know her, try to introduce her to someone else with common interests and make connections. If you don’t already know her, find someone you think she would feel comfortable speaking with to say hello. It’s interesting, sometimes I’m completely uncertain about approaching a woman who’s the only “other” woman at a meetup. So, women should also try to find a commonality — maybe one of her coworkers could introduce you to her. For women, it’s important make these connections in friendly and not competing ways, because oddly enough, when I’m the second woman in the room I don’t want to make the other woman feel uncomfortable either!
  • Realize that small annoyances over years add up to real frustration. I don’t point this out to say “don’t be annoying” but rather, be a great listener and be extremely respectful. Micro annoyances over time add up to women departing technical communities in droves. See what you can do in small ways, not just large, to keep women in your current tech communities.
  • For recruiting, when new women show up online on mailing lists or IRC or Github, please do answer questions with a “there are no questions too small or too large” attitude. I never would have survived my first 90 days working on OpenStack if it weren’t for Jay Pipes and Chuck Thier. Jay patiently helped me set up a real development environment by walking me through his setup on IRC. And since he was used to Github and going to Launchpad/Bazaar himself, he didn’t make me feel dumb for asking. Chuck didn’t laugh too hard when I tried to spell check the HTTP header “referer” to “referrer.” I felt like any other newbie, not a “new girl” with these two. (Woops, and I should never use the term “girl” for anyone over the age of 18.)
  • Recognize individuality when talking to team members, regardless of visible differences like gender or ethnicity. I struggle with this myself, having to pause before talking about my kids or my remodeling projects, since not everyone is interested! I struggle with assumptions about people all the time, and have to actively fight them myself. For men, you don’t want to assume an interest in cars or sports, so really this applies regardless of gender. All humans struggle with finding common interests without making assumptions.
  • See if you can do small, non-attention-drawing actions that ensure the safety of women in your communities. With the OpenStack Summit being held in different cities twice a year, I’ve been concerned for my personal safety as a woman traveling alone. Admitting that fear means I try to be more savvy about travel, but I still make mistakes like letting my phone battery die after calling a cab in another city after 11 at night. If you see a woman at a party alone, see if you can first make her feel welcome, but then also ensure there are safety measures for her traveling after the event.
  • If you see something, say something, and report correctly and safely for both the bad actor and target. This is really hard to do in the moment, believe me, I’ve been there. For me, being prepared is best, and knowing the scenarios and reporting methods ahead of time gives me the slightly better confidence I can do the right thing in the moment even if I’m shocked or scared. Find the “good and bad” ways to deal with incidents through this excellent Allies_training page.

If you’ve read this far, you really do want to make life better as a male ally. Realize that it’s okay to make mistakes — I’ve made them and learned from them over the years. This inclusion work by allies is not the easiest work to do, nor is it rewarding really. It’s the work of being a good human, and we’re all going to screw up. If someone points out a foible to you, such as saying “girls” instead of “women,” say “thank you” and move on, promising to do better next time.

If you think you already do all these things, make sure you look for ways to expand your reach to other minority groups and less privileged participants. I’m trying to do better with the physically different people I encounter at work. I would like to find ways to work well with people suffering from depression. I’ve got a son with Type I diabetes, what sort of advocacy can I do for people with unique medical needs? I’m asking myself how to make a difference. How about you? How can you do your part to equalize the tech industry?

Categories: DITA

Call for Papers now open – Gilbane Conference 2015

The Gilbane Conference 2015 helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and computing technologies to produce superior customer experiences for all stakeholders. Please review the conference and track topics below and submit your speaking proposal. Additionally, answers to the most common questions about speaking at the Gilbane Conference can be found in the Speaker Guidelines. Deadline […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

Call for Papers now open – Gilbane Conference 2015

The Gilbane Conference 2015 helps marketers, IT, and business managers integrate content strategies and computing technologies to produce superior customer experiences for all stakeholders. Please review the conference and track topics below and submit your speaking proposal. Additionally, answers to the most common questions about speaking at the Gilbane Conference can be found in the Speaker Guidelines. Deadline […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

Be sure to read about my Stacker journey

JustWriteClick - Sat, 2015-03-14 19:49

The editors at The New Stack do great things with their articles, and mine is no exception! Be sure to read Anne Gentle: One Stacker’s Journey.

Even though I’ve lived in Austin, Texas, for over 14 years now, I tend to say I’m a midwesterner when asked. There are traits associated with the spirit of the midwest that I’ll always identify in myself: hard work, resource creativity and conservation, humility, and a sense of wonder at trends being set somewhere in the world. Read more…

Categories: DITA

Gilbane Advisor 3.10.15 – We Need to Break the Mobile Duopoly

Gilbane Conference 2015 dates & location Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston, December 1 – 3. New web site and call for papers will be live in a few days. We Need to Break the Mobile Duopoly. We Need a 3rd Mobile OS Andreessen Horowitz’s Peter Levine makes an interesting case. Note he is talking about an open OS – and what he doesn’t say […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA

Gilbane Advisor 3.10.15 – We Need to Break the Mobile Duopoly

Gilbane Conference 2015 dates & location Fairmont Copley Plaza, Boston, December 1 – 3. New web site and call for papers will be live in a few days. We Need to Break the Mobile Duopoly. We Need a 3rd Mobile OS Andreessen Horowitz’s Peter Levine makes an interesting case. Note he is talking about an open OS – and what he doesn’t say […]

This post originally published on %%http://gilbane.com%%

Categories: DITA
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